CLAHRC plays full part in leading health services research event

The severe and enduring mental illness project overview was presented as a poster at the event.

The severe and enduring mental illness project overview was presented as a poster at the event.

A team from the CLAHRC for Greater Manchester were involved in this year’s Health Services Research Network (HSRN) Symposium, delivering presentations, displaying posters and chairing sessions.

Taking place 17-18 June, the Symposium, now in its sixth year, presents the leading edge of health services research and provides a multidisciplinary programme, including plenaries from research and service leaders, presentations and posters, interactive art and technology and commissioned themes.

More than 300 researchers, service leaders, service users, carers and policy makers attended the event in Nottingham. A broad range of organisations were represented: NHS and social care bodies, universities and research institutes, industry and commercial knowledge consultancy, central and local government, patient and citizen groups and the third sector.

Day one of the Symposium looked at presenting evidence. CLAHRC’s Kathryn Oliver and Rebecca Morris delivered separate presentations titled ‘who runs public health’ and ‘working together for health: a qualitative study exploring links between health services and the third sector for chronic condition management’ respectively. Dr Cassandra Kenning presented information about ‘capacity, responsibility and willingness: a qualitative study of patient and practitioner views of self-management in multimorbidity‘. CLAHRC for Greater Manchester’s Director, Bonnie Sibbald, chaired the ‘virtual wards/case management’ session. The team also displayed a poster explaining how one of our projects sets out to improve the physical health care of people with severe and enduring mental illness.

Nicola Small also gave a presentation on telephone based self-management support for vascular conditions via non-healthcare professionals.

Day two’s focus was on using evidence, and Bonnie again acted as chair, this time during the ‘evaluation’ session. A case study provided by Carrie Hunt, Michael Spence and Anna Betzlbacher, titled ‘a new liaison role to address the physical health care of people with severe and enduring mental illness’, was used to promote discussion during the session. Ruth Boaden, Deputy Director, chaired a session titled ‘implementation’.

View the full Symposium programme and find out more about the work we do.