Who cares? Poems from stroke carers

In the third of our blogs to celebrate stroke awareness month, we’ve featured a selection of poems written by stroke carers.

Remember me
By Natalie Halford

The lights are on but no one’s there
I’ve lots of news I want to share
It’s not much good he won’t remember
He thinks it’s June or even December?
When I think of his life before his strokes
His fishing, his whistle and even his jokes
Now he’ll try and sing occasionally
But names are a blank, not even me!
So, at night I go to bed and cry
As I think to myself and wonder why.
I wish I could turn back the clocks you see
Just so that he… could remember me.

Our plight
By Christine Halford

Stroke is a word we all know little about
We soon have to learn of that there’s no doubt
One minute we’re normal whatever that means
The next we can’t speak, except in our dreams
Our legs they feel strange as though they’re not there
Our arms we can’t hold them, up in the air
What is happening we hear ourselves cry
Is this the end are we going to die?
Our lives have changed now we must fight
The stroke must not win as this is our plight
Frustrated and angry that’s you and me
One side of our brain is damaged you see
We have to re-learn the things we once did
And all the adaptations we try and rid.

Untitled
By Geraldine Ellison

F.A.S.T no delays, do just what the advert says
For a stroke affects the brain in so many ways,
When it happens, any time, any day, any date
It certainly doesn’t discriminate.
For the carer and survivor it impacts upon their life
Be they husband, partner, parent or wife.
The life they live will inevitably change
Constant clinics, doctors, appointments to arrange.
You’ll become an expert giving medication
And assisting with constant rehabilitation.
Life will now never be what you had planned
Live it differently, go forward, hand in hand.

As part of her ‘recovery journey’, Mary Burke has an art book in which she muses about her thoughts, feelings and things that happen. This picture from the book focuses specifically on carers.
As part of her ‘recovery journey’, Mary Burke has an art book in which she muses about her thoughts, feelings and things that happen. This picture from the book focuses specifically on carers.

More Information

For more information about our Organising Support for Carers of Stroke Survivors (OSCARSS) work, please contact Katy Rothwell, Programme Manager. We are undertaking this work in partnership with the Stroke Association.

During the month of May, the Stroke Association is raising awareness of the impact of stroke, and sharing information and advice on how to help prevent the condition across the country. To find out more and sign up, please visit www.stroke.org.uk/makemaypurple.

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