Room for improvement in management of people with chronic kidney disease

Our latest evaluation report shows that there’s still progress to be made in caring for people with chronic kidney disease (CKD).

Using IMPAKT™, a software tool designed for use in general practice, we’re able to identify patients with early stage CKD and their risk factors for progression. IMPAKT™ grew from clinical interest in how to identify early stages of CKD and was developed into a package to support improved diagnosis and care in primary care.

Identifying and managing CKD at its early stages reduces the risk of it progressing and of patients having heart attacks and strokes. Excess cardiovascular disease related to CKD is thought to cost the NHS in England £175 million every year. With end stage CKD growing at an estimated 6% each year, diagnosing and treating CKD effectively as early as possible is hugely important. Early identification of CKD allows for early treatment, which reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease and has the potential to reduce costs.

Our results show that National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) indicators of excellent care for CKD, such as blood pressure control, were improved by use of the IMPAKT™ package. However, our recent audit across Greater Manchester and Eastern Cheshire (in collaboration with the Greater Manchester Academic Health Science Network) has shown there are still many areas for improvement. In particular:

  • Diagnosing the significant number of patients that have CKD and remain undetected in primary care
  • Improving the quality and accuracy of proteinuria diagnoses and proactive management of the risk this represents to patients with CKD
  • Controlling blood pressure for more patients diagnosed with CKD to reduce the risk of adverse events through progressive CKD or comorbidities.

More information – and get in touch

For more information please view the evaluation report connected with this work or contact John Humphreys, Project Manager. We are always keen to hear from organisations who have ideas on how we might work together to make improvements to healthcare.